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Methanol Engine Secures Bulker Orders

MAN Energy Solutions
ME-LGIM main engines bound for J. Lauritzen newbuildings; interest in methanol spreading to all segments. To date, ME-LGIM engines have garnered over 160 orders and 500,000 running hours on methanol

Published Dec 7, 2023 12:05 PM by The Maritime Executive

[By: MAN Energy Solutions]

Japan’s Tsuneishi Shipbuilding Co., Ltd. has ordered 3 × MAN B&W 7G50ME-C9.6-LGIM (-Liquid Gas Injection Methanol) main engines in connection with the building of 3 × 81,200 dwt bulk carriers for Danish shipping company, J. Lauritzen. Each engine will feature MAN Energy Solutions’ proprietary EGRBP (Exhaust Gas Recirculation ByPass) emissions-reduction technology. MITSUI E&S will build the engines in Japan.

Bjarne Foldager, Head of Two-Stroke Business, MAN Energy Solutions, said: “We are currently experiencing a wave of ME-LGIM orders and it is great to see such a respected company as J. Lauritzen joining the decarbonisation journey. While car carriers have been to the fore recently, we ultimately expect methanol to figure prominently as a future fuel across all vessel segments and these newbuildings will be capable of trading carbon-neutrally when powered by green methanol and bio-fuel oils. We value this collaboration with J. Lauritzen and appreciate the trust it has placed in us.”

The Kamsarmax vessels will be among the very first methanol-capable bulk carriers in the world and will be fully owned by Lauritzen NexGen Shipping, which J. Lauritzen and Lauritzen Bulkers A/S reportedly will use as a platform for further investments in zero-carbon emission and future-proof assets for the shipping industry. The vessels have been ordered in cooperation with Cargill, the American global food corporation, who will operate the vessels for a minimum period of seven years.

Thomas S. Hansen, Head of Promotion and Customer Support, MAN Energy Solutions, said: “With more than 160 orders and 500,000 running hours accumulated on methanol, the ME-LGIM engine is proven technology and the defacto industry standard for the methanol propulsion of large merchant-marine vessels. As the engines are readily available and methanol dual-fuel types have a lower capital outlay compared to other, alternative fuel-propulsion solutions for ships, we expect to win further orders within the bulk-carrier segment over the coming months and years.”

The products and services herein described in this press release are not endorsed by The Maritime Executive.