NOAA National Ocean Service

The National Ocean Service provides data, tools, and services that support coastal economies and their contribution to the national economy.

How Tide Predictions Made D-Day Possible

D-Day, codenamed Operation Neptune, was the largest amphibious landing not only in World War II, but in history. It marked the sta...

Watching for Changes in Marine Biodiversity

Changes in marine biodiversity—the variety and variability of life in the ocean—can be an early indicator of change, p...

Fast Facts: How Much Oxygen Comes From the Ocean?

Scientists estimate that 50-80 percent of the oxygen production on Earth comes from the ocean. The majority of this productio...

NOAA Proposes to Expand Flower Garden Banks Marine Sanctuary

Some of the healthiest coral reefs in the world are located in the Gulf of Mexico, miles off the coast of Texas and Louisiana. Ris...

NOAA Facts: What Are Plankton?

The word “plankton” comes from the Greek for “drifter” or “wanderer.” An organism is considere...

How Technology Has Changed Spill Response Since Deepwater Horizon

The National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) was on the scene of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill from the earl...

Sharpshooting for Science: Studying Whales with Remote Biopsy

[By Megan Ewald, NOAA Office of Response and Restoration] As the vessel speeds through the icy water in pursuit of whales, one...

NOAA Supports Search for WWII Plane Wrecks in the Great Lakes

There are about 120 World War II-era aircraft lying at the bottom of Lake Michigan - training planes which the U.S. Navy used to p...

Infographic: Marine Debris and the Coastal Tourism Economy

Marine debris is a pervasive issue in many coastal areas of the United States, where tourism and recreation account for $124 billi...

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